Medical Examinations

Always laugh when you can. It is cheap medicine

172 notes

ragincontagion:

The progression of testicular torsion over 4 hours. The torsion occurs when the spermatic cord, which suspends the testicle and provides the blood supply, is mechanically twisted, pinching off the blood flow. The result is ischemia of the testical, a medical emergency that must be corrected to prevent tissue death.

ragincontagion:

The progression of testicular torsion over 4 hours. The torsion occurs when the spermatic cord, which suspends the testicle and provides the blood supply, is mechanically twisted, pinching off the blood flow. The result is ischemia of the testical, a medical emergency that must be corrected to prevent tissue death.

(Source: scielo.br, via nursingisinmyblood)

286 notes

currentsinbiology:

Epigenetic tie to neuropsychiatric disorders found
Dysfunction in dopamine signaling profoundly changes the activity level of about 2,000 genes in the brain’s prefrontal cortex and may be an underlying cause of certain complex neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, according to UC Irvine scientists.



This epigenetic alteration of gene activity in brain cells that receive this neurotransmitter showed for the first time that dopamine deficiencies can affect a variety of behavioral and physiological functions regulated in the prefrontal cortex.
The study, led by Emiliana Borrelli, a UCI professor of microbiology & molecular genetics, appears online in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.
K Brami-Cherrier, A Anzalone, M Ramos, I Forne, F Macciardi, A Imhof, E Borrelli. Epigenetic reprogramming of cortical neurons through alteration of dopaminergic circuits. Molecular Psychiatry, 2014; DOI: 10.1038/mp.2014.67
Image via Resverlogix

currentsinbiology:

Epigenetic tie to neuropsychiatric disorders found

Dysfunction in dopamine signaling profoundly changes the activity level of about 2,000 genes in the brain’s prefrontal cortex and may be an underlying cause of certain complex neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, according to UC Irvine scientists.

This epigenetic alteration of gene activity in brain cells that receive this neurotransmitter showed for the first time that dopamine deficiencies can affect a variety of behavioral and physiological functions regulated in the prefrontal cortex.

The study, led by Emiliana Borrelli, a UCI professor of microbiology & molecular genetics, appears online in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

K Brami-Cherrier, A Anzalone, M Ramos, I Forne, F Macciardi, A Imhof, E Borrelli. Epigenetic reprogramming of cortical neurons through alteration of dopaminergic circuits. Molecular Psychiatry, 2014; DOI: 10.1038/mp.2014.67

Image via Resverlogix

(via --dopamine)

265 notes

ragincontagion:

A Colles’ fracture is a fracture of the distal radius bone above the radio-carpal joint without involvement of the ulnar bone resulting in a posterior and radial displacement of the hand. It’s usually the result of someone trying to break a fall on their outstretched arm and has a high prevalence among patients with osteoporosis.

ragincontagion:

Colles’ fracture is a fracture of the distal radius bone above the radio-carpal joint without involvement of the ulnar bone resulting in a posterior and radial displacement of the hand. It’s usually the result of someone trying to break a fall on their outstretched arm and has a high prevalence among patients with osteoporosis.

(Source: img.medscape.com, via mistressofsurgery)

336 notes

i-heart-histo:

How to construct a blood vessel!
Making sense of the histology of arteries and veins
Source:
If you like words, the full post about How to classify blood vessels (including this image) visit the ihearthisto.com post here
Or you can just sit back, watch and realize that you just learned about the tunics of a vessel. That’s histology folks!
Have fun,
i♡histo

i-heart-histo:

How to construct a blood vessel!

Making sense of the histology of arteries and veins

Source:

If you like words, the full post about How to classify blood vessels (including this image) visit the ihearthisto.com post here

Or you can just sit back, watch and realize that you just learned about the tunics of a vessel. That’s histology folks!

Have fun,

i♡histo

(via thisfuturemd)

779,622 notes

tartandaisys:

corink:

comatose-kitty:

I literally cant fucking breathe XD

IVE BEEN WAITING 2 YEARS FOR THIS VIDEOS RETURN

this is amazing.

(via treeza26)

7 notes

Thanks —dopamine for nominating me i can only do the first 1 and a half rules due to the fact im moving and i dont have aaaaany interwebs/time so i hope this is okay :)

Rules:
Rule 1: Always post the rules. 
Rule 2: Answer the questions the person who tagged you asked, then write 11 new ones. 
Rule 3: Tag 11 people then link them in the post. 
Rule 4: Tell them you tagged them.

Okay awesome i have never done this before so it should be fun ;P

1.What is your favourite quote?

I dont have a favourite quote (im an uncultured swine haha) so i had to think about this;

"The privilege of a life time is being who you are"

This sums up where i am in life both personally and professionally. Personally i am in a stage of transition going into my 3rd and final year moving from the family home i created and spliting up from my long-term boyfriend, leaving me and my beautiful daughter to restart from afresh is crap and scary. However it is the right thing to do, i was unhappy this therefore effected the household. I didnt want to raise my daughter in a negative, unloving (between me and my partner) atmosphere, so however hard and scary and crap it is going to be i have to suck it up because it is for the best.

Professionally i got caught up in the learning process lost my personalilty in a sea of essays OSCEs and the pressure of preformance at clincal placement. I still am trying to adjust my learning attitude and incorperate more of my personalilty this should come easier as it is alot less stressful at home now!

2. What was the last book you read for fun?

The fault in our stars - John Green

I could not put it down and i cried lots at the end, i am a wuss!

http://mashable.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Anchorman1.gif

3. What is your favourite memory?

My favourite memory is climbing a waterfall in jamica with my pops, i distinctly remember how slippy it was and how proud i was once i reached the top. I had a fresh coconut to celebrate haha

http://www.pleated-jeans.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/When-you-get-two-of-your-favorite-flavor-in-a-Starburst-2-pack.gif

4. If you could be fluent in any language, what would it be and why?

I have always wantd to learn japanese, when i was younger i was convinced i would go over there and hang in harajuku on the main street Omotesando when it was closed on sundays. I wanted to take influence when i was studing fashion from the abundence of styles within that district. However now i have grown up a little bit and my path in life has changed and i would now like to study latin!

http://31.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m1wvm9GzWA1qav5oho2_400.jpg

Hells yeah!

5. What Is your favourite TV programme?

Orange is the new black LOVE IT!

http://31.media.tumblr.com/b60fd162a25f152f2f87ff9ab49f812e/tumblr_mr3hu2pDXd1qhvjh0o1_400.gif

Suzanne is my fav :P

6. What’s the farthest you’ve been from your current place of residence?

Erm i think maybe cuba?

7. Who inspires you?

My beautiful daughter honestly it is true, my daughters name means “new beginnings” she is my drive my inspiration, i love her she is my sun and stars (bit of GoT there :P). My reason for living she also keeps me grounded in my hectic life of clinical placement and university :).

8. What’s the weirdest fact about you that you’re willing to share?

Aww man i dont think i have a weird fact erm… I can nail atypical yorkshire famer accent during a rendition of old macdonalds farm? Which leaves my daughter in a fit of giggles every time :)

9. If there were any positive message you would give to your younger self, what would it be?

Be fearless, and dont give a shit what anyone thinks of you, DO NOT let anyone hold you back! You will gain friends and loose friends this isnt your fault its just life!

10. What superpower would you like to have and why?

I would like to fly, lame i know but i would like to show my beautiful daughter how beautiful and vast the world around us is and how lucky we are… just a little perspective some times can go along way :)

It is totally getting too serious….

http://asset-9.soup.io/asset/5533/2690_9daf.gif

11. What is your favourite thing about yourself?

I like the fact i can make people laugh and have fun around me, i work in a stressful serious environment and sometimes if i want to do the charleston to the muppets, after a pretty serious emergency case during turnover then god damn im going too!

http://media.giphy.com/media/J0UgtZkOjXOeY/giphy.gif

Filed under --dopamine idontunderstandtheinterwebs aboutme question

189 notes

mynotes4usmle:

WARFARIN-INDUCED SKIN NECROSIS
Warfarin necrosis usually occurs three to five days after drug therapy is begun, and a high initial dose increases the risk of its development.[3]:122 Heparin-induced necrosis can develop both at sites of localinjection and - when infused intravenously - in a widespread pattern.[3]:123
In warfarin’s initial stages of action, inhibition of protein C and Factor VII is stronger than inhibition of the other vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors II, IX and X. This results from the fact that these proteins have different half-lives: 1.5 to six hours for factor VII and eight hours for protein C, versus one day for factor IX, two days for factor X and two to five days for factor II. The larger the initial dose of vitamin K-antagonist, the more pronounced these differences are. This coagulation factor imbalance leads to paradoxical activation of coagulation, resulting in a hypercoagulable state and thrombosis. The blood clots interrupt the blood supply to the skin, causing necrosis. Protein C is an innate anticoagulant, and as warfarin further decreases protein C levels, it can lead to massive thrombosis with necrosis and gangrene of limbs.
Notably, the prothrombin time (or international normalized ratio, INR) used to test the effect of coumarins is highly dependent on factor VII, which explains why patients can have a therapeutic INR (indicating good anticoagulant effect) but still be in a hypercoagulable state.[1]
In one third of cases, warfarin necrosis occurs in patients with an underlying, innate and previously unknown deficiency of protein C. The condition is related to purpura fulminans, a complication in infants with sepsis (blood stream infection) which also involves skin necrosis. These infants often have protein C deficiency as well. There have also been cases in patients with other deficiency, including protein S deficiency,[6][7] activated protein C resistance (Factor V Leiden)[8] and antithrombin III deficiency.[9]
Although the above theory is the most commonly accepted theory, others believe that it is a hypersensitivity reaction or a direct toxic effect.[1]

mynotes4usmle:

WARFARIN-INDUCED SKIN NECROSIS

Warfarin necrosis usually occurs three to five days after drug therapy is begun, and a high initial dose increases the risk of its development.[3]:122 Heparin-induced necrosis can develop both at sites of localinjection and - when infused intravenously - in a widespread pattern.[3]:123

In warfarin’s initial stages of action, inhibition of protein C and Factor VII is stronger than inhibition of the other vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors IIIX and X. This results from the fact that these proteins have different half-lives: 1.5 to six hours for factor VII and eight hours for protein C, versus one day for factor IX, two days for factor X and two to five days for factor II. The larger the initial dose of vitamin K-antagonist, the more pronounced these differences are. This coagulation factor imbalance leads to paradoxical activation of coagulation, resulting in a hypercoagulable state and thrombosis. The blood clots interrupt the blood supply to the skin, causing necrosis. Protein C is an innate anticoagulant, and as warfarin further decreases protein C levels, it can lead to massive thrombosis with necrosis and gangrene of limbs.

Notably, the prothrombin time (or international normalized ratio, INR) used to test the effect of coumarins is highly dependent on factor VII, which explains why patients can have a therapeutic INR (indicating good anticoagulant effect) but still be in a hypercoagulable state.[1]

In one third of cases, warfarin necrosis occurs in patients with an underlying, innate and previously unknown deficiency of protein C. The condition is related to purpura fulminans, a complication in infants with sepsis (blood stream infection) which also involves skin necrosis. These infants often have protein C deficiency as well. There have also been cases in patients with other deficiency, including protein S deficiency,[6][7] activated protein C resistance (Factor V Leiden)[8] and antithrombin III deficiency.[9]

Although the above theory is the most commonly accepted theory, others believe that it is a hypersensitivity reaction or a direct toxic effect.[1]

(via nursingisinmyblood)

408 notes

jewsee-medicalstudent:

A child is born.
Swedish photographer Lennart Nilsson spent 12 years of his life taking pictures of the foetus developing in the womb. These incredible photographs were taken with conventional cameras with macro lenses, an endoscope and scanning electron microscope. Nilsson used a magnification of hundreds of thousands and “worked” right in the womb.
He published is work as a book, A child is born, in 1965 and it consists of photographs charting the development of the human embryo and fetus from conception to birth. Photographs are accompanied by text, written by doctors, describing prenatal development and offering advice on antenatal care.
This picture shows a foetus of 16 weeks. The skeleton consists mainly of flexible cartridge and a network of blood vessels is visible through the thin skin.

jewsee-medicalstudent:

A child is born.

Swedish photographer Lennart Nilsson spent 12 years of his life taking pictures of the foetus developing in the womb. These incredible photographs were taken with conventional cameras with macro lenses, an endoscope and scanning electron microscope. Nilsson used a magnification of hundreds of thousands and “worked” right in the womb.

He published is work as a book, A child is born, in 1965 and it consists of photographs charting the development of the human embryo and fetus from conception to birth. Photographs are accompanied by text, written by doctors, describing prenatal development and offering advice on antenatal care.

This picture shows a foetus of 16 weeks. The skeleton consists mainly of flexible cartridge and a network of blood vessels is visible through the thin skin.

(via --dopamine)