Medical Examinations

Always laugh when you can. It is cheap medicine

36 notes

Seeking a Tumblr Social Medial Manager for in-Training, the online magazine for medical students

cranquis:

intrainingdoc:

We’re looking for a member of the #medblr/#osteoblr community to join the in-Training team as our Tumblr Social Media Manager!

If you love Tumblr and would love to curate content for 1,000+ followers of the premier online publication for medical students, email us at editorinchief@in-training.org.

We look forward to welcoming you to our team of 24 medical student editors and 200+ contributors from around the globe!

Signal Boost — step right up, med/osteo-blrs!

197,622 notes

angelclark:

5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 

utism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.

Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.

“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

(via --dopamine)

77 notes

emt-monster:

Severe digital ischaemia

A 56-year-old woman with diabetes admitted with abdominal pain and in septic shock and had developed disseminated intravascular coagulation and cyanosis of toes and fingers. A necrotic gallbladder was the culprit. 

She made a good recovery, however, the lesions of the right hand and right foot progressively necrosed, and amputation was required on hospital day 15. She was discharged on hospital day 24.
(NEJM)

emt-monster:

Severe digital ischaemia

A 56-year-old woman with diabetes admitted with abdominal pain and in septic shock and had developed disseminated intravascular coagulation and cyanosis of toes and fingers. A necrotic gallbladder was the culprit. She made a good recovery, however, the lesions of the right hand and right foot progressively necrosed, and amputation was required on hospital day 15. She was discharged on hospital day 24.

(NEJM)

1,186 notes

brains-and-bodies:

dance-0f-the-damned:

How Forensic Entomologists Use Insects to Tell If a Body Was Moved After Death:

In some suspicious death investigations, arthropod (insect) evidence may prove that the body was moved at some point after death. Crime scene insects can tell whether the body decomposed at the location where it was found, and even reveal gaps in the crime time line.
  • Crime Scene Insects Inconsistent with the Body’s Location: The entomologist first identifies all the collected arthropod evidence, cataloging the species present on or near the body. Not every insect belongs in every habitat. Some live in quite specific niches – on limited vegetation types, at certain elevations, or in particular climates. What if the body yields an insect that is not known to live in the area where it was found? Wouldn’t that suggest the body had been moved? 
In his book A Fly for the Prosecution, forensic entomologist M. Lee Goff tells of one such case. He collected evidence from a woman’s body found in an Oahu sugar cane field. He noted that some of the maggots present were a species of fly found in urban areas, not in agricultural fields. He hypothesised that the body had remained in an urban location long enough for the flies to find it, and that it was later moved to the field. Sure enough, when the murder was solved, his theory proved correct. The killers kept the victim’s body in an apartment for several days while trying to decide what to do with it.
  • Crime Scene Insects Inconsistent with the Crime Timeline: Sometimes insect evidence reveals a gap in the time line, and leads investigators to the conclusion that the body was moved. The primary focus of forensic entomology is the establishment of the postmortem interval, using insect life cycles. A good forensic entomologist will give detectives an estimate, to the day or even the hour, of when the body was first colonised by insects. Investigators compare this estimate with witness accounts of when the victim was last seen alive. Where was the victim between when he was last seen and when insects first invaded his corpse? Was he alive, or was the body hidden somewhere?

Again, Dr. Goff’s book provides a good example of a case where insect evidence established such a time gap. A body found on April 18th yielded only First Instar Maggots, some still emerging from their eggs. Based on his knowledge of this insect’s life cycle in the environmental conditions present at the crime scene, Dr. Goff concluded that the body had only been exposed to insects since the previous day, the 17th. According to witnesses, the victim was last seen alive two days prior, on the 15th. It seemed that the body must have been somewhere else, protected from exposure to any insects, in the interim. In the end, the murderer was caught and revealed he had killed the victim on the 15th, but kept the body in the trunk of a car until dumping it on the 17th.

  • Crime Scene Insects in the Soil: A dead body lying on the ground will release all its fluids into the soil below. As a result of this seepage, the soil chemistry changes substantially. Native soil organisms leave the area as the pH rises. A whole new community of arthropods inhabit this gruesome niche. A forensic entomologist will sample the soil below and near where the body was lying. The organisms found in the soil samples can determine whether the body decomposed at the location where it was found, or prior to being dumped there.

Source: Here.

Not the best source but still very interesting stuff

(via cacajao)

4 notes

Hectic

Things are officially ramped up coming into my 3rd year I have a lot of responsibility not only academically but clinically. I find it hard to not have my mentor present with me at all times and kinda forgetting about that, and just cracking on. But the weirdest thing is having the anaesthetist and surgeons a dress ME and not my mentor how empowering is that but also shit scary all at the same time haha!

Filed under rambling don't mind me operating department practitioner surgery anaesthetics medical personal

1,172 notes

thoughtsofmymadlife:

howigotthrunursingschool:

Optical Heartbeat For Better Diagnosis

The Optical Stethoscope is a nifty piece of technology that acts as assistive device for doctors. Through graphic representation on its knob, it shows doctors the heartbeat, or stomach fluid sounds in waveforms. Basic info like heart rate and pulse is displayed for faster comprehension. The basic idea behind the concept is to aid doctors in making faster and accurate diagnosis.


Medical students who are not yet familiar with the sound of internal organs, will find it easy to use this device, especially in an emergency situation.


Read more at http://www.yankodesign.com/2013/07/09/optical-heartbeat-for-better-diagnosis/#YGCj7czRB5ASkJZ8.99 

This is AWESOME. Would be a fantastic learning tool!

(via thecheerfulmedic)